Nowhere Like Home Misadventures in a Changing World What kind of student would go halfway across the world to stir up a tribal independence movement in his summer break At nineteen Jamie was nicely on track to becoming one of the most boring people in

  • Title: Nowhere Like Home: Misadventures in a Changing World
  • Author: Jamie Alexander
  • ISBN: 9781481151825
  • Page: 144
  • Format: Paperback
  • What kind of student would go halfway across the world to stir up a tribal independence movement in his summer break At nineteen, Jamie was nicely on track to becoming one of the most boring people in England, but an impulse trip to the jungles of Kalimantan changed all that Spurred on by what he encountered among the Dayak tribespeople of the Krayan, he made a decisionWhat kind of student would go halfway across the world to stir up a tribal independence movement in his summer break At nineteen, Jamie was nicely on track to becoming one of the most boring people in England, but an impulse trip to the jungles of Kalimantan changed all that Spurred on by what he encountered among the Dayak tribespeople of the Krayan, he made a decision to discover the truth of the world around him, however uncomfortable that truth would turn out to be From the killing fields of Indonesia to the refugee camps of Palestine, this is the remarkable true story of how this decision came to define his life, seeing him visit some of the least accessible and most volatile places on earth, often armed with little than a set of disarmingly rosy cheeks and a quirky sense of humour Exciting, thought provoking, and occasionally disturbing, Nowhere Like Home forces us to question not only the reasons people travel, but also the very foundations of modern society.

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      144 Jamie Alexander
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      Posted by:Jamie Alexander
      Published :2019-03-16T03:25:43+00:00

    One thought on “Nowhere Like Home: Misadventures in a Changing World”

    1. One of my favourite genres is the armchair travel book. It allows me to get a glimpse of the world that is ‘out there’ without actually having to get my feet wet, spend time in dodgy restaurants or worry about not catching flights. Jamie’s book provided me with the opportunity to indulge this side of myself once more and it came at me from a completely different perspective than normal. This was the grittier end of travel, this was travel that might get you killed if you happened into the [...]

    2. Thoroughly enjoyed this book, it manages to balance serious issues with humour and wit. Jamie Alexander is an excellent story-teller and recounts his adventures (and misadventures) in a style that makes you laugh whilst appreciating the gravity of the situations that many people across the world find themselves in. The focus on the human element and not of the machinations of states and controversial politics gives the book a sensitive and intelligent stance without becoming preachy or partisan. [...]

    3. Pretty engagingSometimes I thought the author was an insufferable git, but I believe he knows that sometimes he was. I appreciate the insight of this story and these places. Thank you for the honesty and clarity.

    4. Travel narratives or travel memoirs are an interesting breed. Done well, the “where” isn’t all that important. Sure, you’ll get unique insights into the destination or destinations covered, but for details on that there are better sources. Instead, the genre unfailingly has a (hopefully) unique twist on one or both of two standard lessons. Either the author through their experience learns to understand himself or herself better in some way or they’re shown the truth of the cliché “p [...]

    5. A lot of travel books are just about the journey, the better ones have a sense of inner journey too. This book has so much more. If I'm being brutally honest, I'd say it begins as a bit of a cliche. The author starts off on an adventurous, albeit (compared to what he does later) not overly exciting trip to Borneo where he becomes the first tourist to visit a village in the middle of the jungle. Among other things, he goes hunting, he "meets the locals" and learns, as he puts it, "all of life's l [...]

    6. I was initially bothered by the writing style in this book as he took an abbreviated trip to Borneo and then recounted an inane conversation with a Canadian woman at a youth hostel in Kuala Lumpur. The book started to get better though as he visited a remote part of Indonesia to discover the real story of some atrocities that were committed during the colonial era. I was happy to see that he was tackling some substantial issues and not just recounting various travel stories. Later on in the book [...]

    7. Real travel lit.Like the author of this book, I am a travel junkie too, but also like him, not just for travels sake and the more I do it, the more i want to be a member of the society to where I travel - the goal being to understand better the people of the world, how the world works, and how best to help out one another. I think this author had similar questions he wanted answers for and that is what makes this book better than most travel lit. The book offers a taste of each society to where [...]

    8. I really enjoyed this thought-provoking book. Jamie really does his best to show the human side of some terrible situations across the globe and his efforts to meet the people at the heart of them really pay off, adding a sense that he has made measured judgements about the politics he finds himself immersed in. A large part of the book is about the author becoming part of the adult world and I enjoyed this aspect of it. As a keen traveller I initially found it difficult to empathise with the ex [...]

    9. A bit slow to start, once you get past the rocky beginning with its scenes of college-aged drunkenness, the memoirs actually delve deep into the stories and history behind the unique countries that Alexander explores. He manages to raise profound questions about why we travel and yet keep the overall tone lighthearted and fun. The honesty and self-reflection that Alexander is quite impactful, especially his raw conclusion.

    10. This book is great. Don't normally read travel books but a friend told me I'd like this and she was right. It's really funny, unexpectedly so, and thought provoking too. It's even made me question my career choice (which is probably not a good thing but there we go!) and I can't wait to go abroad again now. Probably not to the same crazy places the author goes though.

    11. Jamie's Travels and ThoughtsVery interesting account of a young man who is seeking a reason for the problems in the world. He talks and listens to the people involved in crisis-laden areas and tries to understand both sides of the issues.

    12. Great bookPoignant message. The young author matures as he travels the world to realize the painful truth of travel addiction and the toll it takes on under developed countries. Eye-opening message from one who has truly examined what's really going on out there.

    13. I enjoyed reading about the author's adventures in the Philippines, Nepal, and Papua New Guinea. That being said, I think I would have enjoyed them even more if he didn't come across as so self-centered.

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