Raptor A Journey Through Birds A stunning debut in the tradition of Robert Macfarlane and Helen MacdonaldOf all the birds of the British Isles the raptor reigns supreme sparking the imagination like no other In this magnificent h

  • Title: Raptor: A Journey Through Birds
  • Author: James Macdonald Lockhart
  • ISBN: 9780007459872
  • Page: 482
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A stunning debut in the tradition of Robert Macfarlane and Helen MacdonaldOf all the birds of the British Isles, the raptor reigns supreme, sparking the imagination like no other In this magnificent hymn to these beautiful animals, James Macdonald Lockhart explores all fifteen breeding birds of prey on these shores from the hen harrier swimming over the land in the dregA stunning debut in the tradition of Robert Macfarlane and Helen MacdonaldOf all the birds of the British Isles, the raptor reigns supreme, sparking the imagination like no other In this magnificent hymn to these beautiful animals, James Macdonald Lockhart explores all fifteen breeding birds of prey on these shores from the hen harrier swimming over the land in the dregs of a May gale on Orkney, to the ghostly sparrowhawk displaying in the fields around his home in Warwickshire This is a book that will change how we think of our own skies.

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      Published :2019-01-06T07:01:27+00:00

    One thought on “Raptor: A Journey Through Birds”

    1. I love watching birds, but I'm not a birdwatcher. If I am out walking and see a bird I'll stop and watch it until it has gone, I don't have the patience to spend the day hiding in a hedge hoping to catch sight of a certain bird, I get restless and end up leaving to explore elsewhere. Lockhart has spent a large amount of his time walking in dire conditions, camping on remote islands for days, stalking wasps and hiding in hedges so that he can catch the briefest glimpse of the various Raptors ment [...]

    2. Raptors have captivated and enthralled man for millennia. Remains of sea eagles have been found in Neolithic tombs and imagery of these magnificent creatures have been discovered all over Europe in art dating back thousands of years. These birds are the pinnacle of the food chain, each having some specialty that makes them super deadly killers. In his debut book, Lockhart uses a chapter to explore each of the 15 species of raptors that live and breed in this country visiting parts of the country [...]

    3. This book was a disappointment.The basic structure is a chapter by chapter account of 15 species of UK raptor, each described in a different place, stretching from Hen Harriers on Orkney in Chapter 1 to Devon Sparrowhawks in Chapter 15. Wrapped into this structure is a tale of the life, and a previous journey, of William MacGillivray (1796-1852), the Scottish ornithologist and naturalist who wrote important works and contributed much to John James Audubon’s Ornithological Biographies. All this [...]

    4. Nearly a 5. This book is a wonderfully personal investigation and account of the 15 different raptors that call the UK home (although some just for the summer). Written in clear, crisp, poetic prose, Lockhart gets up close and intimate with the raptors as he travels the length and breadth of the UK (excluding Northern Ireland). One criticism is perhaps he didn't detail enough the conflict between estate management (especially grouse moors) and raptor conservation, this is something which is deci [...]

    5. This is an account of the fifteen species of British raptors drawing parallels from William MacGillivray's 19th century journey from Aberdeen to London. The technique is similar to Helen MacDonald's Hawk where she describes T H White and Rob Macfarlane's Landmarks' account of Nan Shepherd, J A Baker and Roger Deakin. Somehow the technique does not work well for this book as it did for the other two. However there are some wonderful descriptions of both raptors and MacGillivray which makes me wan [...]

    6. A fascinating combination of autobiography, biography (of the almost-unknown Scottish ornithologist and naturalist, William MacGillvray) and study of Britain's raptors.It's not a detailed technical guide but, in some ways, it's more than that. Lockhart gets inside the minds of the birds, his prose sometimes soaring with the buzzards and kites. He describes each bird against the backdrop of a specific geographical area of Britain - and not always the most obvious location for each bird. While whi [...]

    7. This is a beautifully experienced and written book on the adventure of waiting for and following all so to be watching raptors. The descriptions are so complete that though I am highly unlikely to get to go and see these birds in the manner he has, I feel like I have and the thrill of that. I also love his natural and social observations, and appreciate the objectivity and research behind them. I also am grateful to have learned about William McGillivray, whose books I will now pursue. I will re [...]

    8. If you want a book that goes into all the technical details of the lives of British raptors then this isn't the book for you.If you want a book that expresses the wonder and excitement that raptors can bring, then this is the book for you. Add in the glimpse it gives into the varied nature of our island(s) and the brief, tantalising hint of the story of a relatively unknown Scottish ornithologist, William MacGillivray.Just wish he'd spend a little more time on the birds (which would have made it [...]

    9. Those people, like myself, who are fascinated by Raptors should most definitely not miss this book. Skillfully contrived and beautifully written, it was a joy to read. Access to a British/Scotish dictionary would clarify a good measure of the content, but the author's phrasing is so eloguent that this minor stumbling is a minor impediment.

    10. A beautifully written and fascinating journey into the behaviour and biography of UK raptors linked historically through the changing landscape of the British Isles. Dispersed within is the story of the life of Victorian ornithologist and botanist, William MacGillivray.

    11. I adored this book. His prose is just magical and whilst the myriad of referees to William MacGillivray were occasionally too much for me, there is no doubt the writer has researched his topic meticulously. He has a fabulous eye for detail. The final chapter , on the sparrowhawk , was my favourite.

    12. A journey that takes in the length and breadth of the UK to discover the fifteen different birds of prey in all their glory and their landscapes. Within the pages of Raptor: A Journey Through Birds is an adventure as well as a discovery. A journey of discovery that opens with chapter one in the Orkney with the Hen Harrier and ends with the Sparrowhawk in Devon. For someone like me who has spent a lifetime studying our birdlife in the British Isles and like James Macdonald Lockhart I have travell [...]

    13. This is a beautiful book. James Macdonald Lockhart has woven his story in with that of William MacGillivray, an ornithologist who made a similar journey in 1819. There are 15 chapters in all from the Hen Harrier in the Orkneys to the Sparrowhawk found near Lockhart’s home. In each chapter he describes the land he is in and the birds with prose that is quite lyrical in places. Lockhart also details the history of the area he is in. In the Orkneys he talks Gaelic dialects. Following the Merlin t [...]

    14. 'Raptor: A Journey Through Birds' is a lyrical, poetic, and occasionally superfluous endeavour in nature writing; James Macdonald Lockhart writes with the ease and finesse of a weathered pro. Admittedly, his prose is sometimes overbearingly flamboyant but it's difficult not to see why he romanticises the raptors he discusses so ardently - his enthusiasm is infectious.Another aspect of the book I liked, to my surprise, was its evolving binary structure. As Lockhart 'journeys' from Orkney to Devon [...]

    15. An adoration of raptors. And a celebration of the under appreciated British ornithologist William MacGillivray.This small book presents 15 birds of prey set against 15 places in Britain from Orkney to Devon and follows the Victorian MacGillivray as he walked from Aberdeen to London. An interesting book, especially so if you know very little about raptors but love the sight of them - as I do. It may be less absorbing for those with a deep pre-existing knowledge. The information on the birds is sl [...]

    16. I would rate this a 3.5 really. Its interesting and informative. I definitely learned something about our native raptors with this book but It wasnt quite as gripping or capturing as I had maybe hoped.

    17. This is a beautiful book. Much like the author's journey the narrative meanders through natural and social history. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in the British Countryside.

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